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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
until november 2014. >> senior congressional correspondent dana bash joins me now. dana, can we expect fire woworkt the meeting this morning? >> reporter: possibly, carol. one thing that has been interesting with regard to john boehner's leadership of the republican conference, which certainly is very conservative and he has had to balance that with negotiations with the white house on a number of occasions, one thing that's interesting is that until now he really has been able to maintain their loyalty. and their confidence that whatever he does, he he's doing for a reason because the alternative would be worse. and one thing that he did in a very deliberate way on this particular counter offer, which they sent to the white house earlier this week, was it wasn't just a letter from boehner to the president. it was a letter from the entire republican leadership, including paul ryan, including the budget chair. not just the budget chair but former vice presidential candidate who went across the country, campaigning and promising not to raise tackxes. he is trying to have his bases covere
is standing pat at the white house to figure out just exactly what the movements are every day. dana bash is on capitol hill. dan, let me start with you. we were just hearing from the president and we were cut off by a nasty satellite. let me talk about these business people and what exactly they can bring to the table because it seems as though he's soliciting them for advice. >> reporter: he is. but at the same time, you brought up a good point, that the president really has been doing a lot of the pressure as opposed to sitting down with lawmakers face-to-face. he's using outside groups to put pressure on lawmakers. so he's had middle class americans here at the white house. he's had small business owners and big-time ceos at the white house and now he's reaching out to the business roundtable. many movers and shakers in the business community to make the case as a white house official that if -- without this fiscal cliff situation being resolved, it doesn't give the certainty that not only businesses need to start making investments, to hiring more people, but also middle class americ
. dana bash, capitol hill, following the negotiations. how many times have i said fiscal cliff over the past couple months, i can't even, if i had a nickel for every time i'd be a wealthy man. >> we'd be able to avert the fiscal cliff. >> exactly, very good, so much more clever and quicker than i am. dana good morning. the president and the house speaker offered new proposals. what do you know about them, if anything? >> reporter: you know, they're being very, very careful, they're holding their cards close to the vest, which i think you know as a reporter is frustrating but as somebody who certainly wants to get, to see this solved, that that is a completely nonpart son thing to say. it maybe is a good sign, because both sides are being very careful not to let the cat out of the bag on some of the specifics because they don't want the process to blow up even before it really starts in earnest. what we are told from democratic and republican sources is that it is still really just sort of the big picture that they're going back and forth on, big picture meaning how much are they goi
senior congressional correspondent dana bash has been working her sources throughout the morning, joining me live now from washington. one of the things i see, dana, that's so frustrating, is we get a lot of rhetoric on television and we hear later about secret conversations. i just wonder how much rhetoric is going on behind closed doors or if they're really getting closer. >> reporter: well, you just mentioned there was a monphone l between the speaker and the president, and by all accounts, it really did not go well. i'm learning new information about why that may have been. i talked to a democratic source that the counteroffer the house republicans sent back to the white house late yesterday included a call for a permanent extension of bush era tax cuts for the top 2%. you know we've been talking constantly about the fact that the biggest divide between the two when it comes to taxes is that tax break for the wealthiest. so this democratic source who i talked to familiar with the proposal said this was a sign to the white house that the republicans are either unwilling or not capable
-- hold the phone for a minute here. dana bash from capitol hill is joining me. i heard your question. it was right on point. it was, i believe, question number one for the speaker. which was -- are you willing to start negotiating on the numbers of that top taxation issue between 35 and 39.5. you didn't get your answer. >> reporter: i didn't get my answer. but -- certainly other people were asking similar questions. i'm not sure if could you hear the questions from other reporters. finally, there was one question that asked about whether there is some middle ground on the republican position on the tax rates. the speaker speaker didn't say no. that was one of the most significant moments of this press conference. he didn't say no. his answer was basically that's -- you know, he's willing to talk about a lot of things if the president moves off his my way or the highway attitude. so that was -- again, that's pretty write significant. the other thing that, again, not sure if you could hear the question, somebody asked about the fact that timothy geithner, treasury secretary, said he's
is dana bash, senior correspondent. >> reporter: the house speaker ended the week with a progress report, none. >> when it comes to the fiscal cliff that is threatening our economy and threatening jobs, the white house has wasted another week. >> reporter: he and the president spoke by phone, only once all week, and it didn't produce much. >> just more of the same, it is time for the president to be serious, to come back to us with a counter offer. >> reporter: but what may have been most notable what was john boehner did not say. he did not repeat his demand to keep taxes cuts for the wealthy in place, the biggest issue that divides them, instead he said this. >> there are a lot of things possible for the revenue, to put on the table. but none of it will be possible if the president insists on his position, insists on my way, or the highway. >> reporter: aides to john boehner and the president who are doing the negotiating are tight-lipped. but others suggest possible compromise on the thorny tax issue. one, instead of raising the current tax rate on the wealthy from the 37% from the bu
no previous indication he might quit now. i want to go to dana bash joining me on the phone here. dana, huge surprise to a lot of people. what's behind the resignation. >> reporter: a huge stunner. nobody saw it coming. i was told by a source close to demint he didn't accept the job until yesterday telling the staff this morning, called the governor in south carolina who, of course, will have to appoint the successor and told the republican leaders here. but look. the reason why it's such a surprise is because demint really has been over the past few years somebody who takes pride in his job. and the role that any one senator can do, which is to gum up the works and very much, obviously, an inside job. he said he could be better outside than inside an he said he feels better about leaving because he has been able to get a number -- really, half a dozen tea party-like conservatives elected. >> let me jump in, dana. i want to run through them because, you know, when we think senator demint we think of a tea party stronghold within the u.s. senate and helped and also hurt a number of republican
. >> dana bash is our senior congressional correspondent. she s unearthed some surprising new details here about the speaker's latest offer to the president. dana, what can you tell us? >> reporter: well, we were told first earlier today by democratic source that part of the reason why that phone call between the president and the speaker didn't go so well to put it mildly is because part of the republican counteroffer they sent to the white house yesterday included a renewed call for, quote, permanent tax cuts for the wealthiest americans. now, we know that that is a nonstarter in general for the president. he said it ump team times, but the democrats at the white house felt that to put the word permanent in a republican offer made clear according to the source i talked to that it was -- that they just don't understand what needs to be done to get something to pass the senate and the house, or to get more importantly the president to sign something. that's one of the main reasons why there is a lot of tension today. i can tell you on the republican side, the speaker wasn't happy because h
montgomery, thank you. i want to start there with dana bash here in a moment. because the fiscal cliff debate is starting to sound like, you know, a high stakes game of chicken. there is all kinds of tough talk. no action. right now democrats and republicans are refusing to compromise on this key sticking point, how to get more money from wealthy people. president obama, you know the deal, he wants to raise tax rates for the wealthy. house speaker john boehner wants to close tax loopholes, limit deductions for the wealthy. let's stay on the hill here, let's talk to senior congressional correspondent dana bash. we know the speaker -- we know speaker boehner met with conservative republicans today. did he get any backlash today from his plan? >> reporter: you know what, interestingly it doesn't seem like he did. we know that conservatives are not happy with the idea that their own house republican leadership proposed a plan that includes $800 billion in new revenue. we have seen -- reported on it extensively yesterday and the day before about the e-mail alerts that conservative groups have put
. >> that was kind of funny. that shows how long it has been, dana. i know you covering the hill, the white house for many years. you can't do that without really having a lot of conversation and time with joe bieberman. i remember covering the al gore/lieberman race when he lost in 2000 or so. what do you think he's going to be known for? what is going to stand out, his mark on his 24 years? >> reporter: i think there's no question his mark is how unconventional he has been and particularly the way he has straddled both parties. he's now officially independent, as you mentioned. he was a democrat, a life-long democrat so much so he was chosen by al gore to be the democratic party's vice presidential candidate, running mate, and then just six years later in 2006 he was tossed out by democratic voters in the state of connecticut in the primary there because of his unwavering support for the iraq war. then he became an independent, and then two years after that in 2008 i was on the campaign trail with the republican presidential candidate, john mccain, and joe lieberman was there almost every day a
. dana bash on the hill. a standoff here, republicans essentially saying, look, the president is not being reasonable here, and then you have the white house saying this is magic beans and fairy dust. is this a lot of posturing here? are we really at an impasse? >> yes to both of those questions. there is a lot of post urg, but we do seem to be at an impasse. i want to show our viewers some video that will illustrate just what we're talking about. that is pictures of members of the house of representatives leaving for the week, and now, i don't want tower viewers to get concerned. the calendars on the desk tops are not wrong. it is still wednesday. this did happen at noon on wednesday. it would be nice if all of us could do that, but -- >> yeah, really. >> this is not an accident. republican leaders say that they just simply have nothing to vote on right now on the floor of the house, and, you know, it helps them illustrate the whole message that they're sending out, which is that the ball is in the president's court. it is up to him to respond to the republicans at this point
. leading member of the tea party. he'll take over the head of the heritage foundation. cnn's dana bash live on capitol hill with more. why did senator demint decide to step down? >> we're trying to get more information from his aides. maybe find him in the hallways here. it's a bit of a surprise because demint has felt that he's been able to be effective here in congress because he has been kind of a conservative very willing to push his own leadership in ways that often times they don't want to be pushed with regard to deficit reduction, with regard to strict fiscal policy. that's by far his number one issue. i can tell you he's also really angered republican leaders over the past two election cycles by raising millions of dollars, a lot of money, for republican candidates who "establishment" thought were less able to win the general election. he is a purist. he's an anti-tax, anti-government purist. it does seem that he's kind of had it here. he wouldn't be the only one to say that they don't feel they can get enough done from the inside and it's probably better to go to the house. we'll
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)